FROM LEVI D. GREEN TO MOTHER – NOVEMBER 7, 1862

About this Letter

Levi D. Green was a soldier in the Civil War and wrote a letter to his mother on November 7, 1862. In this letter, he updates his mother on his and his brother Marvin’s health, as well as the status of Marvin who has gone to get his boat payed and was absent from roll call but eventually came out. Levi also requests his mother to send him a pair of boots, a box of things, and money. He asks his mother to update him on the amount of buckwheat, potatoes, beans, and hay they had. He also threatens to come and “bust their shitter” if his mother does not send him money soon.

Levi was a part of the 130th N.Y. State Vols and was attached to Spinola’s Brigade, Peck’s Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps in October. The regiment was commanded by Colonel Alfred (Abraham) Gibbs, who was appointed by General McClellan. The regiment named their camp Camp Thorp when they arrived in Suffolk, VA, and it is believed that the camp was located approximately where the Portsmouth Water Quality Lab is today.

From the letter, it is clear that Levi was in need of supplies and financial support from his family. It is also evident that he was worried about his mother’s financial situation and wanted to ensure that they had enough money to take care of themselves. Through this letter, we get a glimpse of the challenges that soldiers faced during the Civil War and how they had to rely on their families for support.

In conclusion, the letter from Levi D. Green to his mother on November 7, 1862, provides valuable insight into the life of a soldier in the Civil War. Through this letter, we can see the difficulties soldiers faced and how they relied on their families for support. The letter also highlights the strong family ties that existed during this time and the importance of keeping in touch with loved ones despite the challenges of war.

Letter Transcript

FROM LEVI D. GREEN TO MOTHER – NOVEMBER 7, 1862

Camp Thorp Suffolk VA Good morning mother I recieved your letter and glad was to hear that you are all well and in good health. I am well and so is Marvin. Marvin has gone up River to get his boat payed. He has been to the gard house. He was absent from roll call. He came out last nite. I want you to send me a pare of boots for they will cost seven or eight dollers here and a box of things. Direct your box to L. D. Green Co. E 130 Regt in care of Capt. Hakes Fortress Monroe. I want you to write and tell how much buckwheat you had and how many potatoes you had how many beans how much hay you have got if you have not sent me some money you had better send it or I will come and bust your shitter you must send me 5 dollers as soon as you get this and I will send 24 or 30 about new years so good by for now. L. D. Green.

Researcher’s Note:  The 130th N.Y. State Vols. was attached to Spinola’s Brigade, Peck’s Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps in October. Colonel Alfred (Abraham) Gibbs, a classmate of General McClellan at West Point, was appointed by McClelland to command the regiment, taking over for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Thorp and Major Rufus Scott. It is for this reason it is logical to assume that regiment named their camp Camp Thorp when they first arrived in Suffolk, VA as they prepared for future battles. I have documented where I believe Camp Thorp was located. I believe that the location of the camp is approximately where the Portsmoth Water Quality Lab is today. You can find images with location captured in Chapter II of Bowen’s book, linked here.

(Link to article on the maps and locations can be found here)


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