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NumberRankCadett NameSate BornState AppointedCival War ServiceRank Promoted ToMilitary ServiceAdditional Source LinkPhoto
12721Charles Seaforth StewartAt SeaNew JerseyColonel RetiredAn engineer, especially of coastal works in California. Corps of EngineersRead More
12732George Brinton McClellanPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaUSAMajor GeneralPresident Lincoln approved him Major General in the regular army. He was outranked only by General-in-Chief Winfield Scott. He reorganized a disjointed and poorly disciplined army, pushing it into the field in response to Lee's invasion. In 1862, McClellan's Peninsula Campaign unraveled after the Seven Days Battles, and he also failed to decisively defeat Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army at the Battle of Antietam. After the Battle of Antietam, frustrated by McClellan's cautious tactics, Lincoln removed him from command and McClellan was ordered to turn over his command to his good friend Ambrose E. Burnside and to go home to New Jersey to await further orders. These orders never came. In 1864, McClellan was nominated for President by the Democratic Party but lost the election. He did serve as governor of New Jersey from 1878-1881.Read More
12743Charles E. BluntNew HampshireAt LargeUSAColonel RetiredOver forty years as a military engineer, primarily of harborsRead More
12754John Gray FosterNew HampshireNew HampshireUSAMajor GeneralAn engineer during the Civil War he was several times breveted for gallantry in action in the Carolinas and eventually commanded various important Departments; after the war he worked in harbor improvements.Read More
12765Edmund L. HardcastleMarylandMarylandNONEBvt. CaptainFought in the Mexican War, and resigned after a 10 year Army career. Delegate to the Democratic Conventions of Charleston and Baltimore; a Marylander, he then sidestepped the War between the States: state politics, railroads, and farming were his life. Resigned from the Army 1856Read More
12776Francis T. BryanNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNONEU.S. CaptainAs a lieutenant in the Topographical Engineers, he served during the Mexican War on the staff of Gen. Zachary Taylor, was wounded at Buena Vista, and was decorated and brevetted first lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct. He was promoted to first lieutenant in July 1851 and to captain in July 1860. With the outbreak of the Civil War he resigned his commission, on June 10, 1861, and started to return to North Carolina but was arrested so that he could not join the Confederate Army.Read More
12787George H. DerbyMassachusettsMassachusettsNONELieutenantTopographical Engineer, fought in the Mexican War and served in the West; humorous writer of Phoenixiana and the Squibob Papers. Died on sick leave 1861.Read More
12798Jesse Lee RenoVirginiaPennsylvaniaUSAMajor GeneralSeveral brevets for gallantry in the Mexican War. Mortally wounded commanding 9th Corps, Army of the Potomac at South Mountain 1862. Mortally wounded commanding 9th Corps, Army of the Potomac at South Mountain 1862. Jesse Lee Reno, whose surname was originally Renault, was born June 20, 1823, in the Ohio River town of Wheeling, Virginia (now West Virginia); however, his parents moved to Venango County, Pennsylvania around 1832. He was graduated from the Military Academy in 1846, ranking eighth in the class which included George B. McClellan, Stonewall Jackson, and George Pickett. Although he was an ordnance officer from his graduation until the early months of the Civil War, Reno won the brevets of first lieutenant and captain for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and Chapultepec. In the course of the next fifteen years his duties were varied: they included teaching at West Point, membership on ordnance boards, participation in topographical surveys, chief of ordnance on the Utah expedition under Albert Sidney Johnston, and the successive commands of the Mount Vernon, Alabama, and Leavenworth, Kansas, arsenals. He was forced to surrender the Mount Vernon arsenal to the state forces of Alabama in January, 1861. On November 12 of that year Reno was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers and subsequently commanded a brigade of Ambrose E. Burnside's expedition against the Carolina coast that winter, fighting at Roanoke Island, New Bern, and Camden. From April until his recall north in August, 1862, he directed a division in the newly established Federal Department of North Carolina. Reno was appointed major general on August 20 to rank from July 18, 1862, andduring the campaign of Second Manassas, directed Burnside's IX Corps while the latter was in charge of the right wing of John Pope's army which was advancing northward from the line of the Rappahannock. Reno's corps sustained itself well at the battle of Second Manassas and again the following day (September 1, 1862) at Chantilly; then, the IX Corps retired to the Washington defenses along with the rest of Pope's forces. It remained in the capital until it was led out a few days later under the banner of George B. McClellan, who had been restored to command of the Army of the Potomac. In the subsequent Maryland campaign against R. E. Lee's Confederate invaders. Reno was mortally wounded while leading his men into Fox's Gap in South Mountain on September 14, 1862. The field where he was injured is now marked by a seldom­ seen monument to his memory. His body was first taken to Boston, where his wife was residing, and placed in a vault in Trinity Church. On April 9, 18 67, his remains were removed to Oak Hill Cemetery, Georgetown, D. C.Read More
12809Clarendon J. L. WilsonVirginiaVirginiaNONEFirst LieutenantFought in the Mexican War; Died on duty New Mexico Territory 1853.Read More
128110Thomas WheedbeeNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNONEFirst LieutenantOrdnance officer, died on sick leave 1849.Read More
128211Edmund HayesPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaNONEFirst LieutenantArtilleryman, served in the Mexican War and the Third Seminole War; died Died Nov. 25, on duty at sea in 1853.Read More
128312Edward Carlisle BoyntonVermontVermontUSAMajorArtilleryman, fought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War; taught chemistry at the Military Academy and elsewhere, served as Adjutant or Quartermaster at the Academy for ten years, and was an amateur historian, publishing among other things one of the earliest histories of West Point. Adjutant & Quartermaster at West Point DIED MAY 13, 1893, AT NEWBURGH, N. Y. AGED 69.Read More
128413Darius Nash CouchNew YorkNew YorkUSAMajor GeneralFought in the Mexican War, served in the Third Seminole War and on the western frontier, and fought for the Union in the Civil War, commanding the II Corps. DIED FEB. 12, 1897, AT NORWALK, CT.: AGED 74Read More
128514Henry B. SearsMassachusettsMassachusettsNONEFirst LieutenantArtilleryman, fought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War; taught chemistry at the Military Academy and elsewhere, served as Adjutant or Quartermaster at the Academy for ten years, and was an amateur historian, publishing among other things one of the earliest histories of West Point. Resigned 1849. Died, Feb. 12, 1880, at Liverpool, England, aged 55Read More
128615William DuttonConnecticutConnecticutUSAColonelResigned immediately due to illness, and was a civilian educator and businessman; joined the Army again and fought for the Union in the Civil War, but died in 1862 of illness during the war.Read More
128716John A. BrownMarylandMarylandCSALieutenant ColonelServed in the Mexican War and two tours of duty in the Third Seminole War; fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War, and was an engineer after the war. Died, Oct. 8, 1877, at Washington, N. C, aged 51.Read More
128817Thomas Jonathan JacksonVirginiaVirginiaCSALieutenant GeneralBest know by his nickname "Stonewall Jackson," who fought in the Mexican War and taught science and artillery at the Virginia Military Institute; and was a valiant Confederate commander, mortally wounded at Chancellorsville, May 1863, commanding 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.Read More
128918Albert L. MagiltonDelawarePennsylvaniaUSAColonelFought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War; resigned his commission in 1856 but fought for a year for the Union in the Civil War; as a civilian. Professor of Infantry Tactics in the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Free Military School for applicants for the command of African-American troops, Feb. 8 to Sep. 15, 1864. Deputy Collector of U. S. Internal Revenue, at Philadelphia, Pa., 1864-75.Read More
129019Truman SeymourVermontVermontUSAMajor GeneralArtilleryman, fought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War. He was present at the Battle of Fort Sumter. He commanded the Union troops at the Battle of Olustee, the only major Civil War battle fought in Florida.Read More
129120Colville J. MinorDistrict Of ColumbiaDistrict Of ColumbiaNONESecond LieutenantSent to the California theater of the Mexican War, where he died thirteen months after graduating. Died, Aug. 17, 1847, at Monterey, Cal.: Aged 23.Read More
129221Charles Champion GilbertOhioAt LargeUSABrigadier General - Acting Major General not confirmed by the Senate.Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War, against Indians on the western frontier, and for the Union in the Civil War; after the war, commanded several frontier posts, mostly in the northwest. He was promoted to Acting Major General but not confirmed by the Senate.Read More
129322Marcus D.L. SimpsonNew YorkNew YorkUSAColonelFought in the Mexican War and spent forty-two years in the Army. Served: on Special duty, under the orders of the Secretary of War, at San Francisco, Cal., May 8, 1866, to Jan. 12, 1867; as Chief Commissary of Subsistence, Division of the Pacific, Nov. 23, 1867, to Oct. 7, 1873, — of the Division of the Atlantic and Department of the East, Oct. 21, the last thirty-three were as a Commissary officer. Died April 7, 1909, at Riverside, Ill.: Aged 85Read More
129423Rufus BaconMaineMaineNONEBvt. Second LieutenantWas a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Artillery, July 1, 1846. While on authorized graduation leave of absence, July 1 to Aug. 12, 1846. He died unexpectedly (Committed suicide) August 12, 1846, at Buxton, Me at the age of 23.Read More
129524Hamilton ShieldsVirginiaVirginiaNONEBvt. CaptainServed in garrison at Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1846 and was in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29 as a Second Lieut. For the 3d Artillery, Mar. 3, 1847. He was Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico. He was promoted Bvt. Captain, Sep. 8, 1847 for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Molino del Rey, Mexico during the Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847. He was assigned to garrison at Ft. Monroe, Va., 1848, — Ft. Adams, R. I., 1848‑50; as Acting Judge Advocate of the Eastern Division, Nov. 1, 1850, to Sep. 20, 1853; as Aide-de‑Camp to Bvt. Maj.‑General Wool, Nov. 15, 1853, to Feb. 15, 1854; and as Adjutant, 3d Artillery, Feb. 15 to Mar. 15, 1854. He resigned his commission, Mar. 17, 1854. Shields worked as a Counselor at Law, New York, 1854‑57 and latter as a farmer, near Bennington Vt., 1857‑89. Shields died, Nov. 24, 1889, at Troy, N. Y.: Aged 67.Read More
129625John AdamsTennesseeTennesseeCSABrigadier GeneralWas a Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War and against Indians in the West. Adams resigned his commission in the United States Army in early 1861 and joined the Confederate Army not long afterward as a captain in the cavalry. He was commissioned a colonel in 1862, and a Brigadier General in December of that same year and was in charge of his brigade of infantry. Adams served entirely in the Western Theater.Read More
129726Richard RushEnglandAt LargeUSAColonelServed during the Civil War from 1861‑64 in Defense of Washington, D. C., Dec., 1861 to Mar., 1862; in the Virginia Peninsular Campaign (Army of the Potomac), Mar. to Aug., 1862, being engaged in a Skirmish at Hanley's Bridge, May 24, 1862, — Action of Hanover C. H., May 27, 1862, — Battle of Gaines's Mill, June 27, 1862, — Battle of White Oak Swamp, June 30, 1862, — and Battle of Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862; in the Maryland Campaign (Army of the Potomac), Sep. to Dec., 1862, being engaged in Skirmish at Jefferson Pass, Sep. 13, 1862, — Battle of South Mountain, Sep. 14, 1862, — Battle of Antietam, Sep. 17, 1862, — and Skirmishes at Williamsport, Md., Sep. 19, 1862, and Occoquan, Va., Dec. 24, 1862; in the Rappahannock Campaign (Army of the Potomac), Jan. to Apr., 1863, being engaged in Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class. Stoneman's Raid upon Richmond, Apr. 13‑27, 1863; on sick leave of absence, Apr. 27 to May 27, 1863; in Provost Marshal General's Bureau, May 10 to Nov. 10, 1863, in Organizing the Veteran Reserve Corps; in Preparing Rock Island Prison, Ill., Nov. 10 to Dec. 20, 1863; as President of Board for Examination of Officers, Jan. 3 to Mar. 20, 1864; and in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., commanding Brigade, Mar. 20 to July 1, 1864.

Resigned, July 1, 1864.
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129827Henry Astor EhningerNew YorkNew YorkNONEFirst LieutenantCadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Artillery, July 1, 1846. Served in the War with Mexico, 1846-48, being engaged in the Siegeof Vera Cruz, Mar. 9-29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17 - 18, 1847, — and in Defense of Puebla, Sep. 13 to Oct. 12, 1847; and in garrison at Ft. Monroe, Va., 1848. He was assigned Second Lieut for the 4th Artillery, Mar. 3, 1847. He resigned, Jan. 6, 1849. Civil History. — U. S. Consul at Cienfuegos, Cuba, August, 1886, to August, 1894 since which time he resided in Cuba. Ehninger died Sept. 15, 1915, at Havana, Cuba: Aged 91.Read More
129928Thomas F. CastorNONEFirst LieutenantCastor was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1841, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 2d Dragoons, July 1, 1846 and Second Lieut., 1st Dragoons, Dec. 6, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1847‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — and Operations before and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; and on frontier duty at Crow Wing, Min., 1848, — Ft. Snelling, Min., 1848‑49, — Ft. Ripley, Min., 1849‑50, — Ft. Snelling, Min., 1850‑51, — Benicia, Cal., 1852, — Ft. Reading, California. He was promoted First Lieutenant of the 1st Dragoons, Oct. 9, 1851. He was assigned to Scouting Duty in 1853, being engaged against Illinois Indians, in a Skirmish near the source of Illinois River, Or., Oct. 24, 1853, — Ft. Lane, Or., 1853‑54, — Benicia, California, 1854, — Ft. Miller, Cal., 1854, — and Ft. Tejon, Cal., 1854‑55. He died, Sep. 8, 1855, at Ft. Tejon, Cal.: Aged 33.​ Castor is buried in Fort Tejon Military Cemetery, Kern County, CA.Read More
130029Orren ChapmanNew YorkNew YorkNONEFirst LieutenantChapman was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1841, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 2d Dragoons, July 1, 1846. He served: in the War with Mexico, 1847-48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Skirmish of Medellin, Mar. 25, 1847, — Second Lieutenant with the 1st Dragoons, Feb. 7, 1847 and Bvt. First Lieutenant, Mar. 25, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Affair at Medellin, near Vera Cruz, Mexico.) Quartermaster, 1st Dragoons, Apr. 15 to May 26, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Reconnoissance of the approaches to the City of Mexico, Sep. 12, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848; on frontier duty at Ft. Scott, Kan., 1848‑49, 1849‑50, — March to Santa Fé, N. M., 1850, — Las Vegas, N. M., 1850‑51, — Scouting, 1851, — Las Vegas, N. M., 1851,º — Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., 1853,º — Santa Fé Route, 1853, — Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., 1853‑54, — and Ft. Union, N. M., 1854; at the Military Academy, as Asst. Instructor of Cavalry Tactics, Aug. 21, 1855, to Sep. 1, 1856; and on frontier duty at Ft. Buchanan, N. M., 1857‑58. He was promoted First Lieutenant, 1st Dragoons, Feb. 1, 1853 and he died, Jan. 6, 1859, at St. Louis, Mo.: Aged 38.Read More
130130Alexander P. RodgersNew YorkAt LargeNONESecond LieutenantRodgers was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1841, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Infantry, July 1, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Capture of San Antonio, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — and Storming of Chapultepec, where, in leading a Company to the Assault of the Castle, when within a few yards of the ditch, "still exerting himself, though already wounded, and shouting for his men to follow," he was Killed, Sep. 13, 1847: Aged 22 as a Second Lieutenant (promoted Oct. 12, 1846) in the 4th Infantry,Read More
130231Oliver H. P. TaylorRhode IslandRhode IslandNONEFirst LieutenantTaylor was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 1st Dragoons, July 1, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Skirmish of Embudo, N. M., Jan. 29, 1847, — Assault of Pueblo de Taos, N. M., Feb. 4, 1847, — and Assault of Santa Cruz de Rosales, Chihuahua. Promoted Second Lieutenant with the 1st Dragoons, Feb. 16, 1847) and Bvt. First Lieutenant, Feb. 4, 1847 for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Conflicts at Embudo and Taos, N. M.)

In 1848 Taylor was on frontier duty at Santa Fé, N. M., 1848, — Albuquerque and promoted Bvt. Capt., Mar. 16, 1848, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Santa Cruz de Rosales, Mexico

N. M., 1848‑49, — Scouting, 1849, being engaged against Apache Indians, in a Skirmish at the Cañon del Peñon, Sierra Sacramento, N. M., July 18, 1849, — Taos, N. M., 1849‑50, — Scouting, 1850, being engaged against Apache Indians, in Surprise of 150 of their Lodges, near the source of Costilla River, N. M., July 26, 1850, — and at Rayado, N. M., 1850‑51; in garrison at the Cavalry School for Practice, Carlisle, Pa., 1851; on frontier duty at Los Lunas, N. M.,º 1852, — Quartermaster, 1st Dragoons, Apr. 22, 1852, to July 31, 1854, — and Ft. Leavenworth,

(First Lieut., 1st Dragoons, Feb. 21, 1853)

Kan., 1852, 1852‑53, — 1853‑54; on sick leave of absence, 1854‑55; on Recruiting service, 1855‑56; and on frontier duty at Ft. Lane, Or., 1856, — Ft. Yamhill, Or., 1856‑57, — Ft. Walla Walla, Wash., 1857, 1858, — and on Spokane Expedition, 1858, being engaged in the desperate Combat of To‑hots-nim‑me, Wash., on the Colville Trail, Utah, where he was killed, May 17, 1858: Aged 33.
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130332Samuel Davis SturgisPennsylvaniaAt LargeUSAMajor General(With Gibbs as a Colonel, 7th Cavalry, May 6, 1869)

— of Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., Oct. 22, 1869, to Mar., 1871, — and of post of Louisville, Ky., Mar. 29, 1871, to Apr. 29, 1873; as Superintendent of Mounted Recruiting Service, and in command of Cavalry Depot, St. Louis, Mo., Oct., 1874, to Oct. 7, 1876; in command of regiment and Ft. Lincoln, Dak., Oct. 20, 1876, to Oct. 29, 1877, — on Yellowstone Expedition in Montana Territory, May to Oct., 1877; on leave of absence, Oct. 29, 1877, to Feb. 28, 1878; in command of regiment, and of Middle District, Feb. 28, 1878, to Jan. 5, 1881 (commanding troops at Bear Butte, Dak., July to Sep., 1878); on leave of absence to Feb. 21, 1881; Member of Board to examine and recommend text-books for schools in the Army to Apr. 5, 1881; in command of regiment and post of Ft. Meade, Dak., May 19 to June 16, 1881; as Governor of the Soldiers' Home, near Washington city, July 1, 1881, to May 15, 1885; and in command of regiment and post of Ft. Meade, Dak., to June 11, 1886 (leave of absence, Nov. 17, 1885, to May 10, 1886).

Retired from Active Service, June 11, 1886, he being 64 Years of Age.

Died, Sep. 28, 1889, at St. Paul, Min.: Aged 67.
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130433George StonemanNew YorkNew YorkUSAMajor GeneralHe studied at the Jamestown Academy and entered the United States Military Academy in 1842; his roommate at West Point was future Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. He graduated 33rd in his class of 59 cadets in 1846. Stoneman was commissioned as a second Lieutenant in the Mormon Battalion, which from 1846 to 1847 made the march from Iowa to California, to participate in the Mexican–American War, though by the time the battalion arrived, California was controlled by the United States, and his unit never actually saw combat.[3] Stoneman was assistant quartermaster for the march. He fought in the Yuma War and was responsible for survey parties mapping the Sierra Nevada range for railroad lines.[4] After promotion to captain of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry in March 1855, he served mainly in Texas until 1861.

At the start of the Civil War Stoneman was in command of Fort Brown, Texas, and refused the order of Maj. Gen. David E. Twiggs, a southern sympathizer, to surrender to the newly established Confederate authorities there, escaping to the north with most of his command.[5] Returning east, he was reassigned to the 1st US Cavalry and promoted to major on May 9, 1861. Stoneman then served as adjutant to General George McClellan during his campaign in Western Virginia during the summer. After McClellan became commander of the newly-formed Army of the Potomac, he assigned Stoneman as his chief of cavalry; Stoneman was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on August 13.[6] Stoneman had a difficult relationship with McClellan, who did not understand the proper use of cavalry in warfare, relegating it to assignment in small units to infantry brigades.


Following the failures of the Peninsula campaign, Stoneman was reassigned to the infantry, and received command of the 1st Division of the III Corps on September 10 after its former commander, Maj. Gen. Phil Kearny, had been killed a week earlier. The III Corps remained in Washington, D.C., during the Maryland campaign. On October 30, Stoneman was placed in command of the entire III corps. At Fredericksburg, it formed part of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker's Center Grand Division and helped drive back a Confederate assault during the battle. Following Fredericksburg, Hooker became commander of the Army of the Potomac and decided to re-organize the cavalry into a single corps with Stoneman at its head.
Stoneman's raids
Main articles: Stoneman's 1863 raid, Stoneman's 1864 raid, and Stoneman's 1865 raid
Union General George Stoneman & staff, 1863.

The plan for the Battle of Chancellorsville was strategically daring. Hooker assigned Stoneman a key role in which his Cavalry Corps would raid deeply into Robert E. Lee's rear areas and destroy vital railroad lines and supplies, distracting Lee from Hooker's main assaults. However, Stoneman was a disappointment in this strategic role. The Cavalry Corps got off to a good start in May 1863, but quickly bogged down after crossing the Rapidan River. During the entire battle, Stoneman accomplished little, and Hooker considered him one of the principal reasons for the Union defeat at Chancellorsville.[8] Hooker needed to deflect criticism from himself and relieved Stoneman of his cavalry command, sending him back to Washington, D.C., for medical treatment (chronic hemorrhoids, exacerbated by cavalry service),[9] where in July he became a Chief of the U.S. Cavalry Bureau, a desk job. A large cavalry supply and training depot on the Potomac River was named Camp Stoneman in his honor.

In early 1864, Stoneman was impatient with garrison duty in Washington and requested another field command from his old friend Maj. Gen. John Schofield, who was in command of the Department of the Ohio. Although originally slated for an infantry corps, Stoneman assumed command of the Cavalry Corps of what would be known as the Army of the Ohio. As the army fought in the Atlanta Campaign under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Stoneman commanded an unsuccessful raid of the infamous Andersonville Prison.[10] In the course of the raid he and his aide, Myles Keogh were captured by Confederates outside of Macon, Georgia.[11] However, the 5th Indiana Cavalry Regiment under Col. Thomas Butler made a valiant stand, allowing the rest of his forces to retreat. They were surrendered as well, despite protest by Col. Butler.[12] Stoneman became the highest-ranking Union prisoner of war,[13] and he remained prisoner for three months.

Stoneman was exchanged relatively quickly due to the personal request of General Sherman. Following his release, Stoneman was briefly the commander of the Department of the Ohio. In December 1864, Stoneman led a raid through southwestern Virginia.[15] In March 1865, Stoneman took roughly 4,000 troops out of Knoxville, Tennessee, and led them on a raid of Virginia and North Carolina, the intent being to cripple Confederate infrastructure and demoralize the population. Within a week, they had sacked the towns of Hillsville, Asheville, and Christiansburg, among others, and destroyed several bridges, lead mines and railroads.

Mustered out of Volunteer Service, Sep. 1, 1866. Va., Dec. 17, 1866, to June 1, 1868, — of First Military District, June 2, 1868, to Mar. 31, 1869, — of Regiment to June 4, 1871, — of District of Arizona, Aug. 16, 1869, to May, 1870, — and of Department of Arizona, May 3, 1870, to June 4, 1871; awaiting orders and the action of the Retiring Board, June 4 to Aug. 16, 1871.

Retired from Active Service, Aug. 16, 1871, for Disability contracted in the Line of Duty.

Resigned, Sep. 15, 1882.

POST War Civil History. — Railroad Commissioner of the State of California, to Nov. 15, 1882. Member of Board of Commissioners for Indian Affairs, 18–––. Governor of the State of California, Jan. 10, 1883, to Jan. 10, 1887.

Colonel of Infantry, Feb. 9, 1891
— by act of Congress, Dec. 15, 1890.

Retired, Feb. 24, 1891.

Died, Sep. 5, 1894, at Buffalo, N. Y.: Aged 72.
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130534James OakesPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaUSAColonelCadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 2d Dragoons, July 1, 1846.

Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Chihuahua Expedition, 1846, — Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — a Skirmish at Medellin, Mar. 25, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Operations before and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 12‑14, 1847, — and as Adjutant, 2d Dragoons, April to Nov. 1, 1847; as Quartermaster, 2d Dragoons, Nov. 1, 1847, to Aug. 15, 1849; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848; on frontier duty, on March through Texas, 1848, — Austin, Tex., 1848‑49, — Ft. Graham, Tex., 1849, — Austin, Tex., 1849, — Ft. Lincoln, Tex., 1849‑50, — Scouting, 1850, being engaged against Comanche Indians in Skirmishes between the Nueces and Rio Grande, Tex., July 11 and Aug. 12, 1850, and in the latter was severely wounded (two wounds); on Recruiting service, 1850‑52; on frontier duty at Ft. Mason, Tex., 1852‑53, — and Ft. Terrett, Tex., 1853; on Coast Survey, Sep. 29, 1853, to Apr. 4, 1854; on sick leave of absence, 1854; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1855; on Recruiting service, 1855; on frontier p283 duty at Ft. Mason, Tex., 1856, — Scouting, 1856, being engaged in a Skirmish near the South Fork of the Llano River, Tex., Feb. 17, 1856, — Ft. Mason, Tex., 1856, — Scouting, 1856, being engaged in a Skirmish near the source of Concha River, Tex., May 2, 1856, — and Pursuit and Surprise of three parties of Indians near the mouth of the Pecos River, Aug. 30, 1856, — Ft. Clark, Tex., 1856‑58, — Scouting, 1858, — and San Antonio, Tex., 1858; on sick leave of absence, 1858‑60; and on frontier duty at Ft. Inge, Tex., 1860‑61.Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1861‑66: on Mustering duty at Wheeling, Va., May 3 to Sep. 12, 1861; in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., commanding regiment, Sep. 26, 1861, to Jan. 14, 1862; in the Tennessee and Mississippi Campaign, commanding Regiment (Army of the Ohio), Feb. to June, 1862, — March to Pittsburg Landing, Mar.‑Apr., 1862, — Battle of Shiloh, Apr. 7, 1862, — and Advance upon and Siege of Corinth, Apr. 9 to May 30, 1862; on leave of absence, June 19 to Sep., 1862; in command of Regiment (Army of the Mississippi), Sep.‑Oct., 1862, being engaged in the Battle of Corinth, Mis., Oct. 3‑4, 1862; on Mustering and Disbursing duty at Jackson, Mich., Oct. 11, 1862, to Apr. 29, 1863; as Acting Asst. Provost Marshal General for the State of Illinois, at Springfield, Ill., Apr. 29 to Sep. 30, 1866; as Superintendent of Volunteer Recruiting Service, and Chief Mustering and Disbursing Officer of the State of Illinois, Sep. 18, 1863, to Sep. 30, 1866; and in command of the District of Illinois, Sep. 22, 1865, to July 31, 1866. Served: on leave of absence, Sep. 30, 1866, to Jan. 20, 1867; in command of regiment at Austin, Tex., Feb. 1, 1867, to Apr. 4, 1868; as Member of Court Martial and of Inquiry, Apr. 4, 1868, to Mar. 30, 1869; in command of regiment and Ft. Richardson, Apr. 16, 1869, to Mar. 20, 1871, — and Ft. Hays, Kan., June 8 to Dec. 13, 1871; on leave of absence, Dec. 13, 1871, to Nov. 12, 1872; in command of regiment in Kansas, Nov. 12, 1872, to Feb. 18, 1875; on sick leave of absence, Feb. 18 to Oct. 31, 1875; as Member of Court of Inquiry to Dec. 24, 1875; in command of regiment and Camp Lowell, Ara., Feb. 29 to Oct. 9, 1876; on sick leave of absence, Oct. 9, 1876, to June, 1878; in command of regiment and Camp Lowell, Ara., Oct. 21 to May 12, 1879.

Retired from Active Service at his own Request, Apr. 29, 1879,
having Served over 30 Years.


(Bvt. First Lieut., Mar. 25, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Affair at Medellin, near Vera Cruz, Mex.)
(Second Lieut., 2d Dragoons, July 29, 1847)
(Bvt. Capt., Sep. 8, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Molino del Rey, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 1st Dragoons, June 30, 1851)
(Captain, 2d Cavalry, Mar. 3, 1855)
(Major, 2d Cavalry, Apr. 6, 1861: 5th Cavalry, Aug. 3, 1861.)
(Brig.‑General, U. S. Volunteers, May 17, 1861: Declined)
(Lieut.‑Colonel, 4th Cavalry, Nov. 12, 1861)
(Bvt. Colonel, and Bvt. Brig.‑General, U. S. Army, Mar. 30, 1865,
for Meritorious and Faithful Service in the Recruitment of the Armies of the United States)
(Colonel, 6th Cavalry, July 31, 1866.)

Colonel, U. S. A., Retired, April 29, 1879,
at His Own Request, After Over 30 Years' Service.

Died Nov. 27, 1910, at Washington, D. C.: Aged 84.
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130635William Duncan SmithGeorgiaGeorgiaCSABrigadier GeneralChoosing to follow his home state and the Confederate cause, Smith resigned his U.S. commission on January 28, 1861. He entered service in the Confederate States Army on March 16 as a captain in the cavalry, but transferred to the infantry that same day, also with a promotion to major. Shortly afterward he was assigned to the 1st Georgia Regular Infantry Regiment.

Smith was made the Assistant Adjutant General of the Defenses of Savannah, Georgia on June 25. He was promoted to colonel on July 14 and given command of the 20th Georgia Infantry. On March 7, 1862 he was confirmed a brigadier general and assigned to the 1st Brigade of the Confederate District of Georgia in the Department of South Carolina & Georgia from April 30 to July 8. During this period he led one of the wings of Brig. Gen. "Shanks" Evans's army that won the Battle of James Island (Battle of Secessionville). He was then given command of the First Subdistrict of the District of South Carolina (same department) until his death on October 4.

Smith died of yellow fever on duty in Charleston, South Carolina. His body has brought back to his home town, and he was buried in Augusta's City Cemetery.
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130736George F. EvansMarylandMarylandNONESecond LieutenantEvans was a Cadet at the Military Academy, Sep. 5, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 1st Dragoons, July 1, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Battle of Buena Vista, Feb. 22‑23, 1847; on frontier duty on March to California, (Evans was promoted Bvt. First Lieut., Feb. 23, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Buena Vista, Mexico). In service in 1848, — Los Angeles, Cal., 1848‑49, — San Diego, Cal., 1849, — Escorting Boundary Commission, 1849‑50, — San Diego, Cal., 1850, — and San Luis Rey, Cal., In 1850; and on sick leave of absence, 1850‑59. Died, Mar. 29, 1859, at Augusta, Me.: Aged 35. Died on sick leave, 1859Read More
130837Dabney Herndon MauryVirginiaVirginiaCSAMajor GeneralWhen the Civil War began, Maury was the Assistant Adjutant General in the New Mexico Territory, based in Santa Fe. Hearing the news of the firing on Fort Sumter, he resigned from the United States Army and travelled back to Virginia. He entered the Confederate Army as a colonel, serving as an Adjutant General, then was Chief of Staff under General Earl Van Dorn. Following the Battle of Pea Ridge, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier general and assigned to field command. Maury led a division at the Second Battle of Corinth, and was appointed major general in November 1862. He participated in army operations around Vicksburg, Mississippi, and in the defense of Mobile, Alabama. In the latter military campaign, Maury commanded the Department of the Gulf. With the conclusion of the Civil War, Maury came home to Virginia and established an academy in Fredericksburg to teach classical literature and mathematics. He moved to New Orleans, where a business venture failed and he returned to Virginia. In 1868 he organized the Southern Historical Society, based in Richmond. D. H. Maury spent 20 years working for the Southern Historical Society that produced 52 volumes of Southern history and genealogies. Two years after his wife died, Maury began a movement in 1878 to reorganize the National Militia. He authored a treatise entitled Skirmish Drill for Mounted Troops in 1886. Maury, appointed by President Cleveland, served as Minister to Colombia from 1887 to 1889. General Maury died at the home of his son (Dabney Herndon Maury Jr.) in Peoria, Illinois, and his remains were interred in the Confederate portion of the city cemetery in Fredericksburg, Virginia.Read More
130938Innis Newton PalmerNew YorkNew YorkUSABrigadier GeneralWith the outbreak of the Civil War, Palmer advanced in rank again, becoming a major of a cavalry battalion, April 25, 1861. At the First Battle of Bull Run, he led this battalion of seven companies of horsemen, and was again recognized for his gallantry. Afterwards, Palmer found out that he commanded the only Union cavalry present at the battle. He was transferred to the 5th U.S. Cavalry Regiment on August 3, 1861. On December 21, 1861, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers to rank from December 20, 1861. President Abraham Lincoln officially nominated Palmer for this appointment on December 21, 1861 and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment March 17, 1862. Palmer commanded a brigade in the IV Corps during the Peninsula campaign. He stayed with his brigade on the Peninsula afterwards, and spent the rest of the war holding various commands in the Virginia-North Carolina area. In 1863 he was appointed to the Regular Army rank of lieutenant colonel of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry. Palmer successfully defended a garrison at New Bern, North Carolina from a Confederate attack led by Maj. Gen George Pickett on February 1, 1864 and his command linked up with William T. Sherman's army as it drove up through the state in March 1865. He was mustered out of the volunteers on January 15, 1866. On January 13, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Palmer for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from March 13, 1865, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on March 12, 1866.

In June 1868, Palmer became colonel of the regiment. He retired at his own request in March 1879.[1] He died on the morning of September 10, 1900 of complications from kidney failure in Chevy Chase, Maryland. His interment was in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.
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131039James StuartSouth CarolinaSouth CarolinaNONESecond LieutenantStuart was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., Mounted Rifles, July 1, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, being engaged in the Siege p287 of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco,

(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico.)

Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and (Bvt. Captain, Sep. 13, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Chapultepec, Mex.) Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848; on Recruiting service, 1848‑49; and on frontier duty at Ft. Vancouver, Wash., 1851, — and on Rogue River Expedition, Or., 1851, being engaged in a Skirmish, June 17, 1851, where he was Mortally Wounded. (Second Lieut., Mounted Rifles, Oct. 9, 1847) Stuart ied of Wounds, June 18,​ 1851: Aged 26 Mortally wounded in Indian wars, Oregon, 1851
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131140Parmenas T. TurnleyTennesseeTennesseeUSACaptainTurnleys was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 2d Infantry, July 1, 1846.

Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, at and about Monterey, (Second Lieut., 1st Infantry, Oct. 31, 1846) 1846, — Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, remaining in garrison there till Nov., 1847; on Recruiting service, 1847; in the War with Mexico, 1847‑48, at the City of Mexico and Cuernavaca; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848; on frontier duty at Austin, Tex., 1848‑49, — Ft. Duncan, Tex., 1849‑50, — Quartermaster and Commissary of Train to (First Lieut., 1st Infantry, June 10, 1850, to Feb. 11, 1856) Ft. Bliss, Tex., 1850, — Ft. McIntosh, Tex., 1850‑51, — commanding Escort to Ft. Duncan, Tex., 1851, — Ft. McIntosh, Tex., 1851‑52, — Ft. Terrett, Tex., 1852, — and as Quartermaster, 1st Infantry, Mar. 1 to July 1, 1852, being engaged in Opening Road and Transporting Supplies to New Mexico; on Recruiting service, 1852‑54; in Quartermaster-General's Office at Washington, D. C., Sep. 27, 1854, to Mar. 2, 1855; on Quartermaster duty at Cincinnati, O., 1855, — Sioux Expedition, 1855, — Ft. Pierre, Dak., 1855‑57, — Oregon, 1857, — Ft. Brown, Tex., 1857‑58, — and as Chief Quartermaster of the forces Operating in Utah Territory, 1858‑60; and on leave of absence, 1860‑61.

(Captain, Staff — Asst. Quartermaster, Mar. 2, 1855)

Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1861‑65; in Superintending the repairs of Railroad between Harrisburg, Pa., and Baltimore, Md., Apr. to May, 1861; as Chief Quartermaster, at Perryville Depot, Md., May, 1861, — Annapolis Depot, Md., May to July, 1861, — St. Louis Depot, Mo., July to Dec., 1861, — Cairo Depot, Ill., Jan. to July, 1862, — and Memphis, Ten., July to Sep., 1862; on sick leave of absence, "with permission to go beyond the seas," Sep. 25, 1862, to

Retired from Active Service, Sep. 17, 1863, for Disability resulting from Long and Faithful Services and Disease Contracted in the Line of Duty) Feb. 21, 1865; and as Chief Quartermaster of the District of the Plains, headquarters Denver City, Col., Mar. 22 to Dec. 31, 1865.

Resigned, Dec. 31, 1865.

POST WAR -- Civil History. — Mayor of Highland Park, Ill., 1888‑92. Residence, Highland Park, Ill. Residence, Highland Park, Ill.


Civil History. — Engaged in Mining Operations in Colorado and Montana Territories, — in Farming in East Tennessee, and Banking business at Chicago, Ill., 1865‑74, — Mayor of the City of Highland Park, Ill., since 1888. Served successively as Alderman and as Mayor of Highland Park, Ill., from 1888 to 1892; then engaged in literary work and lecturing and public speaking. Author of several books and many pamphlets, etc., especially The Turnleys, issued in 1905, 200 pages; Turnley's Narrative from Diary, issued in 1892, 400 pages, and pamphlets on current subjects of the day. Member of Loyal Legion, Sons of American Revolution; member of the Aztec Club and of the Military Order of Foreign Wars, and of the Institute of Civics, etc.

Died April 22, 1911, at Highland Park, Ill.: Aged 89.
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131241David Rumph JonesSouth CarolinaSouth CarolinaCSAMajor GeneralJones was appointed a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army on June 17, 1861, and major general on October 11, 1862. He commanded a brigade in Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard's Confederate Army of the Potomac at the First Battle of Bull Run and then a brigade in the division of Maj. Gen. John B. Magruder in the Peninsula Campaign. In the Seven Days Battles, he temporarily led the division when Magruder served as a wing commander. When Magruder departed for the Western Theater in July, Jones got permanent command, leading his troops at Second Battle of Bull Run and the Battle of Antietam, in both cases under Maj. Gen. James Longstreet.

At Antietam, his division held the right flank of the Army of Northern Virginia when the Union IX Corps attacked across the Burnside Bridge. The death of Jones' brother-in-law, Union colonel H.W. Kingsbury, in that fight, coupled with the strain of campaigning aggravated a longstanding heart condition and Jones died in Richmond, Virginia the following January of heart disease 1863. He is buried there in Hollywood Cemetery.

After Jones died, his division was broken up and its brigades reassigned to McLaws' and Hood's divisions.
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131342Alfred GibbsNew YorkNew YorkUSABVT. Major GeneralBorn at his father’s estate in Sunswick, NY, now part of Astoria, in Long Island, Ravenswood district in New York, he was the grandson of Oliver Wolcott, Secretary of the Treasury in the Washington and Adams Administrations. He attended school at White Plains, NY, and Dartmouth College before receiving an appointment to the Military Academy and graduated in the Class of 1846. He graduated with a brevet to 2nd Lieutenant, Mounted Rifles, on July 1, 1846. He served in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, MO, in 1846, before entering the Mexican War.

Gibbs was engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, March 9-29, 1847, and Battle of Cerro Gordo, April 17-18, 1846, where he was wounded. He was breveted to 1st Lieutenant, April 18, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the Battle of Cerro Gordo. He was next engaged in the Battle of Contreras, August 19-20, 1847; Battle of Churubusco, and in Kearny’s Charge on the San Antonio Garita, August 20, 1847; Battle of Chapultepec, September 13, 1847; and the Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, September 13-14, 1847. He was breveted to Captain, on September 13, 1847, for gallant conduct at Garita de Belen, Mexico City. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, Mounted Rifles, on December 31, 1847.

He served as Aide-de-Camp to Major-General Persifor F. Smith, March 27, 1848-July 1, 1856, in Mexico, 1848; en route to California, 1848- 1849; in the Pacific Division, 1849-1852; and the Department of Texas, 1852-1856. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Mounted Rifles, on May 31, 1853.

Gibbs was on Frontier Duty, at Ft. Fillmore, NM, 1856-1857; Scouting, 1857, being engaged against the Apache Indians in a Skirmish at Cooke’s Spring, NM, March 8, 1857, where he was severely wounded; at Ft. Fillmore, NM, 1857; Ft. Union, NM, 1857-1858; on Recruiting Service, 1858-1860. He was on Frontier Duty conducting recruits to New Mexico, 1860; on the Navajo Expedition, NM, 1860; at Albuquerque (Depot Commissary), NM, 1860-1861; and on the March to Ft. Fillmore, NM, being captured by Texas insurgents at San Agustin Springs, NM, July 8, 1861. He declined a brevet to Captain, Assistant Adjutant-General on May 11, 1861, but was promoted to Captain, Mounted Rifles, May 13, 1861, and assigned to 3rd Cavalry on August 3, 1861.

During the Civil War, Gibbs served in command of Ft. Wayne, MI, in December, 1861-August, 1862. He was promoted to Colonel, 130th NY Volunteers, September 6, 1862, and of the 1st NY Dragoons (aka 19th NY Cavalry), July 28, 1863.

He served in operations about Suffolk, VA, September 15, 1862-June 13, 1863, being engaged in the Action of Deserted House, January 29, 1863, and the Defense of Suffolk, May 11-20, 1863. Gibson was on Major-General Keyes’ Peninsular Expedition towards Richmond, June 13-July 12, 1863; at the Headquarters of the Provost Marshal of the Army of the Potomac, July 19-August 1, 1863; in organizing Regiment as Cavalry, at Manassas Plains, and guarding Orange and Alexandria Railroad, VA, August 1-November 26, 1863, being engaged in skirmishes, October 17-November 19, 1863; in command of Cavalry Reserve Brigade (Army of the Potomac), November 26, 1863-April 1, 1864, being engaged in guarding supply train during Mine Run operations, December 1863, and in the Attack at Barnet’s Ford, February 11, 1864.

Gibbs was in the Richmond Campaign, commanding Cavalry Reserve Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Army of the Potomac), May 7-August 5, 1864, being engaged in the Combat of Todd’s Tavern, May 7, 1864; Capture of Spottsylvania Court House, May 8, 1864; on “Sheridan’s First Raid” to Hexall’s Landing, and returning to New Castle, May 9-29, 1864, participating in the engagements at Beaver Dam, May 9-10; Yellow Tavern, May 11, Meadow Bridge, May 12; Mechanicsville, May 12; Hanover Town, May 27; and Hawes’ Shop, May 28; at the Action of Old Church, May 30, 1864; Combat of Cold Harbor, May 31-June 1, 1864; and “Sheridan’s Second Raid” to Trevillian Station and Lighthouse Point, June 7-28, 1864, including the engagements at Trevillian Station, June 12, Mallory’s Ford, June 12, Tunstall’s Station, June 21 and Darby Town, June 28. He was breveted to Major, on June 11, 1864, for gallant and meritorious services at the Battle of Trevillian Station, VA.

He continued in the Shenandoah Campaign, commanding Regiment, August 6-December 8, 1864; Cavalry Reserve Brigade, December 12- 30, 1864; and Cavalry Division, December 30, 1864, January 15, 1865. During this time he was engaged in Skirmishes at Newtown, August 11; Cedarville, August 16; Kearneysville, August 25; Shepherdstown, August 25; Smithfield, August 28; and Crossing of the Opequan, August 29, 1864. He was engaged in the Battle of Opequan, on September 19, 1864, and breveted that date to Lieutenant Colonel for gallant and meritorious services at the Battle of Winchester, VA.

Gibbs was thereafter engaged in the Battle of Fisher’s Hill, September 22, 1864; Skirmishes of Mount Jackson, September 23, New Market, September 25, Port Republic, September 26, Cross Keys, September 28, Tom’s Run, October 9, Woodstock Races, October 9, and Strasburg, October 14, 1864; and the Battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864. He was promoted to Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, on October 19, 1864.

He was thereafter engaged in Skirmishes at Middletown, November 12; commanding the Raid on Gordonsville, December 9-29, 1864; on leave, January 18-February 5, 1865; in command of Reserve Cavalry Brigade on “Sheridan’s Sixth Raid” on Virginia Central and Danville Railroads, and James River Canal, February 27-March 20, 1865, being engaged in the Actions of the North and South Anna Bridges, March 14- 15, 1865.

Gibbs was in command of the Cavalry Brigade in the final Attack and Pursuit of the Rebel Army of Northern Virginia, March 29-April 9, 1865, being engaged in the Battle of Dinwiddie Court House, March 31, 1865; Battle of Five Forks, April 1, 1865; Battle of Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; Action of Appomattox Station, April 8, 1865; and Surrender of General R. E. Lee at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. Until the surrender at Appomattox, Gibbs’ command played a large part in enveloping the renowned Army of Northern Virginia.

Breveted to Colonel, March 13, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services at the Battle of Five Forks, VA. Breveted to Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, March 13, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services in the field during the Rebellion. Breveted Major-General, U. S. Army, March 13, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services during the Rebellion.

Gibbs was in command of the 1st Brigade Cavalry Forces (Military Division of the Gulf), August 20-October 17, 1865; and of the 1st Division, October 17-December 15, 1865. He was on leave of absence, January 15-April 30, 1866, and mustered out of volunteer service, on February 1, 1866.

He served on Recruiting Service, April 30-September 30, 1866, and was promoted to Major, 7th Cavalry, July 28, 1866. Gibbs served on Frontier Duty at Ft. Riley, KS, October, 1866-January 4, 1867; at Ft. Harker, KS, January 4-April 1, 1867; Ft. Riley, KS, April 1867; Ft. Hays, KS, May- July 1867; Ft. Harker, KS, September 15-November 6, 1867; Ft. Leavenworth, KS, November, 1867-September 5, 1868; Forts Dodge and Harker, KS, to November 30, 1868; and at Ft. Leavenworth, KS, to December 26, 1868, when he died suddenly of “congestion of the brain”. He was buried in St Mary’s Cemetery, Portsmouth, RI.
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131443George Henry GordonMassachusettsMassachusettsUSABvt. Major GeneralWhen the Civil War erupted in 1861, Gordon organized and became colonel of the 2nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. The regiment served guarding the upper Potomac River and Frederick, Maryland, and in the spring of 1862, Gordon served under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, unsuccessfully opposing Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley. Gordon was appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on June 12, 1862, to rank from June 9, 1862.

Gordon commanded a brigade in XII Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the Battle of Antietam, becoming acting division commander when Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams became acting corps commander. He also took command of 1st Division, XI Corps, following the Battle of Gettysburg and was transferred with it to the Department of the South. There he commanded troops on Folly Island, South Carolina. Starting in November 1864, Gordon served in the Department of Virginia.] He commanded the Eastern District of that department from February 1865 until he left the army.

Gordon served in the army until August 24, 1865. On January 13, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Gordon for the award of the honorary grade of brevet major general, United States Volunteers, to rank from April 9, 1865, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the award on March 12, 1866.

After the Civil War, Gordon worked as a Counselor at Law, Boston, Mas., 1865‑86. U. S. Collector of Internal Revenue, Boston, Mas., 18–––. Author of "History of Second Massachusetts Regiment," 1876; of "History of the Campaign of the Army of Virginia, under General John Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class.Pope, from Cedar Mountain to Alexandria," 1879; and of "A War Diary of the Events of the War of the Great Rebellion, 1863‑65," 1882.

Died, Aug. 30, 1886, at Framingham, Mas.: Aged 63. Buried, Edgell Grove Cemetery, Framingham, MA.
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131544Frederick MyersConnecticutConnecticutUSALieutenant ColonelMyers was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1841, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 5th Infantry, July 1, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847; on Recruiting service, 1847‑48; in the War with Mexico, 1848, at the City of Mexico; in garrison at East Pascagoula. In 1848 he was on frontier duty at Ft. Towson, I. T., 1848‑50, — Camp Arbuckle, I. T., 1850‑51, — March to Texas, 1851, — Ft. Belknap, Tex., 1851, 1852‑53, — Ft. McIntosh, Tex., 1853‑54, — Ringgold Barracks, Tex., 1854‑56, — and as Quartermaster, 5th Infantry, Jan. 1, 1855, to May 1, 1856; on Recruiting service, 1856; and on Quartermaster duty at Fts. Fillmore and Union, N. M., 1857‑59; on leave of absence, 1859; on Quartermaster duty with Major Steen's command in the field, in Southeast Oregon, 1860, — and at Ft. Steilacoom, Wash., 1860‑61.

Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1861‑66: in organizing Ohio Volunteers, at Columbus, O., Sep., 1861, to Apr., 1862; as Chief Quartermaster of the Department of the Rappahannock, Apr. to July, 1862, — of 3d Army Corps, in the Virginia Peninsular Campaign, July to Aug., 1862, — of 1st Army Corps, in the Maryland Campaign,

Sep., 1862, — and as Deputy Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac on the March to Falmouth, Va., and in the Rappahannock Campaign, Sep. 17, 1862, to Mar. 18, 1863; as Chief Quartermaster of the Department of the Northwest, Apr. 1, 1863, to Feb. 1, 1865, — of the Military Division of the Missouri, Feb. 1 to July 20, 1865, — and of Department of Missouri, July 20 to Sep. 30, 1865; in settling accounts at St. Louis, Mo., and on Board of Examination at Washington, D. C., Oct. 1, 1865, to Mar. 29, 1866; and on tour of Inspection of the Military Posts of the Department of the Missouri, Mar. 29 to May 31, 1866. Served: as Quartermaster, at headquarters, Department of the Missouri, May 31, 1866, to Jan. 17, 1867; on Special duty at Chicago, Ill., Feb. 13, 1867, to Apr. 15, 1869; and as Chief Quartermaster of the Department and District of Louisiana, Apr. 20, 1869, to Apr. 22, 1870, — of the Depot at New Orleans, La., Apr. 22, 1870, to Apr. 25, 1871 (sick leave of absence, June 1 to Oct. 1, 1871), — and of the District of New Mexico, Nov. 20, 1871, to July 7, 1874.

(Second Lieut., 5th Infantry, Nov. 23, 1846)
(First Lieut., 5th Infantry, Oct. 7, 1848, to Apr. 1, 1857)
(Captain, Staff — Asst. Quartermaster, Aug. 29, 1856)
(Major, Staff — Additional Aide-de‑Camp, May 23, 1862)
(Lieut.‑Colonel, Staff — Additional Aide-de‑Camp, July 15, 1862, to May 31, 1866)
(Major, Staff — Quartermaster, Aug. 12, 1864)
(Bvt. Lieut.‑Col., Bvt. Colonel, and Bvt. Brig.‑General, U. S. Army, Mar. 13, 1865, for Faithful and Meritorious Services during the Rebellion)
(Lieut.‑Colonel, Staff — Dep. Quartermaster-Gen., Mar. 4, 1867)

Died, July 7, 1874, at Santa Fé, N. M.: Aged 52.

Buried, Santa Fe National Cemetery, Santa Fe, NM.
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131645Delancy Floyd-JonesNew YorkNew YorkUSALieutenant ColonelWith the outbreak of the Civil War, Floyd-Jones was promoted to Major of the 11th U.S. Infantry on May 14, 1861, and sent to the Eastern Theater. During the 1862 Peninsula Campaign in Virginia, Floyd-Jones commanded the 11th Infantry at the battles of Yorktown, Gaines Mill and Malvern Hill. He was appointed a brevet lieutenant colonel on July 4, 1862, for "gallant and meritorious service during the Peninsular Campaign." He served in the Northern Virginia Campaign, August to September 1862, including the Second Battle of Bull Run. During the Maryland Campaign, his regiment was lightly engaged at the Battle of Antietam, where they took a position immediately east of Sharpsburg.

Floyd-Jones was active in the Rappahannock Campaign and the Mud March, then went into winter camp prior to seeing action again at the Battle of Chancellorsville. At the Battle of Gettysburg, Floyd-Jones led his men into action near the Wheatfield, suffering substantial casualties. He was appointed a brevet colonel, July 2, 1863, for "gallant and meritorious service at Gettysburg."

On August 1, 1863, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 19th U.S. Infantry and was assigned to supervise recruitment at Fort Independence in Massachusetts. In October of that year, he assumed command of the defenses and fortifications of Boston Harbor, a post he held until March 1865. He was brevetted brigadier general on March 13, 1865, and became commander of the 19th Infantry in April 1865.

After the war, Floyd-Jones served in a variety of administrative posts, commanding Newport Barracks in Kentucky from October 1865 to March 1866, and the occupation garrison of Little Rock, Arkansas, from March to August 1866. Following sick leave, he was assigned as Acting Assistant Inspector General and Judge Advocate of the Department of Arkansas from December 1866 to February 1867. He was then in command of Fort Smith, Arkansas until October 1867, and then of Fort Gibson and the District of Indian Territory until January 1868. On June 25, 1867, he was promoted to colonel and assigned to the 6th U.S. Infantry. He served as Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Idaho Territory from June 1869 to November 1870, then at various times commanded Fort Dodge, Fort Hays, the post at Holly Springs, Mississippi, Jackson Barracks in New Orleans, Louisiana, and the garrison in Helena, Montana. In 1871, he was assigned to the 3rd U.S. Infantry. He retired March 20, 1879.

He died January 19, 1902 (aged 75) New York City, U.S.
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131746John D. WilkinsNew YorkNew YorkUSAColonelCadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Skirmish of Ocalaca, Aug. 16, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848; on frontier duty at San Antonio, Tex., 1849, — San Elizario, Tex., 1849‑50, — Ft. Bliss, Tex., 1850‑51, — San Elizario, Tex., 1851, — Ft. Fillmore, N. M., 1851‑52, — Ft. Bliss, Tex., 1852, — Ft. Fillmore, N. M., 1852‑53, 1854‑55, — Albuquerque, N. M., 1855, — and Ft. Stanton, N. M., 1855‑56; as Adjutant, 3d Infantry, Jan. 19, 1856, to May 1, 1860, — at Ft. Fillmore, N. M., 1856, — Santa Fé, N. M., 1856‑57, — Albuquerque, N. M., 1857‑58, — and Santa Fé, N. M., 1858‑60; as Acting Asst. Adjutant-General, Department of New Mexico, Sep. 16, 1858, to May 1, 1860; on Recruiting service, 1860‑61; in garrison at Ft. Hamilton, N. Y., 1861; and on Recruiting service, 1861‑62.

Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1862‑66: in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., Feb.‑Mar., 1862; in the Virginia Peninsular Campaign (Army of the Potomac), Mar. to Aug., 1862, being engaged in the Siege of Yorktown, Apr. 5-May 4, 1862, — Operations before Richmond, June 25-July 1, 1862, — and Battle of Malvern Hill (commanding Regiment), July 1, 1862; in the Northern Virginia Campaign, Aug.‑Sep., 1862, being engaged in the Battle of Manassas, Aug. 29‑30, 1862; in the Maryland Campaign, in command of 3d Infantry (Army of the Potomac), Sep. to Nov., 1862, being engaged in the Battle of Antietam, Sep. 17, 1862, — and March to Falmouth, Va., Oct.‑Nov., 1862; in the Rappahannock Campaign, commanding 3d Infantry (Army of the Potomac), Dec., 1862, to May, 1863, being engaged in the Battle of Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, — and Battle of Chancellorsville, May 2‑4, 1863; on Recruiting service, May, 1863, to Oct., 1864; in the Richmond Campaign, in command of Regiment (Army of the Potomac), Feb. to Apr., 1865, being engaged in the Siege and Assaults of Petersburg, Mar. 25 to Apr. 2, 1865; in command of Regiment in the Department of the Cumberland, Apr. to Aug., 1865, — and in the Department of Alabama, Aug. 18 to Oct. 26, 1865; and as Provost Marshal of the District of Mobile, Ala., Oct. 26, 1865, to July 9, 1866.

Served: in garrison at Macon, Ga., Aug. 11, 1866, to Jan. 13, 1867, — and at Dahlonega, Ga., Jan. 13, 1867, to Aug. 9, 1868 (leave of absence, May 20 to Aug. 31, 1867), — Mobile, Ala., to June 1, 1869, — Macon, N. C., to Feb. 17, 1870, — Columbia, S. C., Feb. 25 to Oct., 1870, — David's Island, N. Y., to Nov., 1871, — and Chicago, Ill., Nov. 3, 1871, to May 3, 1872; on frontier duty at Beaver, Utah, May 25, 1872, to July 10, 1874, — in command of regiment, Jan. 26 to Nov. 2, 1874, — and Ft. Whipple, Ara., July 14 to Nov. 2, 1874; at headquarters, Department of Arizona, to May 19, 1875, and as Chief Signal Officer of Department of Arizona, to Apr. 10, 1876; in command of Ft. Whipple, Ara., Apr. 16, 1876, to Dec. 2, 1877, and Acting Chief Signal Officer of Department of Arizona, Oct. 11 to Dec. 21, 1876; on Detached Service to Santa Fé, N. M., Dec. 2, 1877, to Jan. 3, 1878; on frontier duty at Ft. Whipple, Ara., to July 31, 1878, — and Camp McDermitt, Nev., Aug. 21 to Oct. 2, 1878; on leave of absence, Oct. 13, 1878, to May 9, 1879; in command of Ft. Bidwell, Cal., to Mar. 16, 1880, — of Benicia Barracks, Cal., to Mar. 16, 1882, and casually there to May 11, 1882; on leave of absence, to Oct. 28, 1882; in command of Regiment and Ft. Keogh, Mon., Nov. 8, 1882, to Sep. 28, 1884; on leave of absence, to Nov. 6, 1884; in command of Regiment and Ft. Keogh, Mon., to Aug. 1, 1886.

John Darragh Wilkins: Born Jan. 20, 1826, Pittsburgh, PA.
Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Infantry, July 1, 1846.
(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 3d Infantry, Nov. 10, 1851)
(Captain, 3d Infantry, Apr. 11, 1861)
(Bvt. Major, July 1, 1862,
for Gallant and Meritorious Services at the Battle of Malvern Hill, Va.)
(Bvt. Lieut.‑Col., May 3, 1863,
for Gallant and Meritorious Services at the Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Va.)
(Major, 15th Infantry, May 6, 1864)
(Transferred to 33d Infantry, Sep. 21, 1866)
(Lieut.‑Colonel, Staff — Asst. Inspector-General, June 13, 1867)
(Lieut.‑Colonel, 8th Infantry, Feb. 19, 1873)
(Colonel, 5th Infantry, June 22, 1882)
Retired from Active Service, Aug. 1, 1886, he being 64 Years of Age.

Died Feb. 20, 1900, at Washington, D. C.: Aged 77.

Buried, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA.
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131847Joseph N.G. WhistlerWisconsinAt LargeUSAColonelWhistler was a Cadet at the Military Academy, Sep. 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 8th Infantry, July 1, 1846. Served of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848; on frontier duty at San Elizario, Tex., 1849‑50, — Ft. Bliss, Tex., 1850, — Convoying Wagon Trains, 1850, — Cebolleta, N. M., 1850‑51, — Navajo Country, 1851, — Ft. Defiance, N. M., 1851‑53, — and Ft. Craig, N. M., 1854‑56; on Recruiting service, 1856‑58; on frontier duty at Los Lunas, N. M.,º 1858‑60, — Ft. Fillmore, N. M., 1860, — Ft. McIntosh, Tex., 1860‑61, — Mouth of the Rio Grande, 1861, — and Indianola, Tex., 1861, where he was captured by Texas insurgents, and paroled as a Prisoner of War; and in garrison at Ft. Hamilton, N. Y., 1861. Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1861‑66: at the Military Academy, as Asst. Instructor of Infantry Tactics, Sep. 25, 1861, to Mar. 20, 1863; as Commissary of Musters for the Department of Virginia, Apr. to May, 1863; in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., May 6, 1863, to May 15, 1864; in the Richmond Campaign (Army of the Potomac), May to June, 1864, being engaged in the Battle of Spottsylvania, May 18‑20, 1864, — Battles of North Anna, May 21‑25, 1864, — Battle of Tolopotomy, May 28‑29, 1864, — Battle of Cold Harbor, June 1‑3, 1864, — Assaults on Petersburg, June 16 and 18, 1864, — and Siege of Petersburg, June 19, 1864, where he was wounded; on sick leave of absence, disabled by wound, June to July, 1864; in command of Brigade in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., July, 1864, to Sep. 19, 1865, being engaged in the Defense of the Capital, July 11‑12, 1864, against the Rebel Raiders under General Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class.Early; on leave of absence, Oct. 17 to Nov. 16, 1865; and in command of 3d Battalion, 13th Infantry, at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., Nov., 1865, to Apr., 1866. Served: on frontier duty at Ft. Rice, Dak., Jan., 1866, to July, 1867, — in command of Ft. Totten, Dak., to July, 1869, — Ft. Randall, Dak., July, 1869, to Sep., 1870, — and Ft. Sully, Dak., Sep. 24, 1870, to Oct. 25, 1872 (commanding escort to Union Pacific Railroad Survey, Aug. 28 to Oct. 25, 1871); on leave of absence to Jan. 12, 1873; in garrison at Newport Barracks, Ky., Jan. 12, 1873, to Oct. 27, 1874, being in command from Nov. 10, 1873; on frontier duty in command of Ft. Ripley, p298 Kan.,​a Nov. 6, 1874, to Aug. 9, 1876, — and of Camp on Tongue River, Mon., Aug. 28 to Dec. 30, 1876; on Detached Service at St. Paul, Min., to Jan. 29, 1877; on leave of absence to Dec. 1, 1877; and in command of Ft. Snelling, Min., Dec. 29, 1877, to May 21, 1878, — and Ft. Keogh, Mon., June 5, 1878, to June 23, 1879; on duty at Poplar Creek Agency, Mon., to Aug. 28, 1879; in command of Ft. Keogh, Mon., to Sep. 15, 1879; at headquarters, Department of Dakota, St. Paul, Min., to Oct. 18, 1879; on sick leave of absence, to May 10, 1880; in command of Ft. Keogh, Mon., to May 30, 1881; on Court Martial duty to July 8, 1881; in command of Ft. Keogh (of regiment to Nov. 8, 1882) to July 10, 1883; on sick leave of absence to Oct. 16, 1883; and in command of regiment and post of Ft. Buford, Dak., to Oct. 19, 1886.

(Second Lieut., 3d Infantry, Jan. 7, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 3d Infantry, June 6, 1852)
(Captain, 3d Infantry, May 14, 1861)
(Colonel, 2d N. Y. Volunteer Artillery, May 6, 1863)
(Bvt. Major, May 24, 1864,
for Gallant and Meritorious Services at the Battle of North Anna, Va.)
(Bvt. Lieut.‑Colonel, June 19, 1864,
for Gallant and Meritorious Services in Front of Petersburg, Va.) (Major, 13th Infantry, Dec. 31, 1864)
(Bvt. Colonel, Mar. 13, 1865,
for Gallant and Meritorious Services during the Rebellion)
(Bvt. Brig.‑General, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865,
for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct during the Rebellion)
(Mustered out of Volunteer Service, Dec. 19, 1865)
(Lieut.‑Colonel, 5th Infantry, Feb. 18, 1874)
(Colonel, 15th Infantry, May 31, 1883)

Retired from Active Service, Oct. 19, 1886, he being 64 Years of Age.

Died April 20, 1898, at Wadsworth, N. Y.: Aged 77.
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131948Thomas EasleyVirginiaVirginiaNONESecond LieutenantEasley was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 8th Infantry, July 1, 1846.

He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — and Battle of Churubusco, where, while advancing through a murderous fire to the assault of the strongly intrenched Convent serving as a citadel, he was killed, Aug. 20, 1847: Aged 24.

(Second Lieut., 2d Infantry, Feb. 16, 1847)
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132049Nelson H. DavisMassachusettsMassachusettsUSABrigadier-GeneralCadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1841, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 3d Infantry, July 1, 1846.

He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Skirmish of Ocalaca, Aug. 16, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., Jefferson Barracks, Mo., and Ft. Hamilton, N. Y., 1848; on voyage to California, 1848‑49; on frontier duty at Monterey, Cal., 1849, — and Bear Creek, Cal. (Camp Far West), 1849‑50; in the Expedition to the Sierra Nevada, being engaged in Actions on Clear Lake and Russian River, and Skirmishes on Pitt River, 1850; on frontier duty at Camp Far West, Cal., 1851‑52, — Ft. Reading, Cal., 1852‑53, — Rogue River Expedition, 1853, — and at Ft. Reading, Cal., 1853‑54; in garrison at Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1854, — and Detroit, Mich., 1854; on Recruiting service, 1854‑55; and on frontier duty at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., 1855‑56, — Ft. Pierre, Dak., 1856, — Ft. Randall, Dak., 1856‑57, — Scouting, 1857, — Ft. Ridgely, Min., 1857‑58, — March to the Red River of the North, 1858, — Ft. Abercrombie, Dak., 1858‑59, — Ft. Ripley, Min., 1859‑60, — Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1860‑61, — and Ft. Ripley, Min., 1861.

Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1861‑66: on the Upper Potomac, June to July, 1861; in the Manassas Campaign of July, 1861, being engaged in the Battle of Bull Run, Va., July 21, 1861; on Provost duty at Washington, D. C., July to Sep., 1861; in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., Sep. to Nov., 1861; on Inspection duty with Army of the Potomac, Nov., 1861, to Apr., 1862, and was engaged in a Skirmish near Warrenton Junction, Va.; in the Virginia Peninsular Campaign, Apr. to Aug., 1862, being engaged in the Siege of Yorktown, Apr. 5 to May 4, 1862, — Battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862, — Skirmishes on the Chickahominy, May, 1862, — Battle of Fair Oaks, May 31 to June 1, 1862, — Battle of White Oak Swamp, June 28, 1862, — Battle of Glendale, June 30, 1862, — Battle of Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862, — and Skirmish of Harrison's Landing, July 2, 1862; on Inspection of the Defenses of Washington, south of the Potomac, Sep., 1862; in the Maryland Campaign (Army of the Potomac), Sep., 1862, being engaged in the Battle of South Mountain, Sep. 14, 1862, — and Battle of Antietam, Sep. 17, 1862; on Special duty, making investigations, Oct. to Nov., 1862; on Inspection duty at Nashville, Ten., Dec., 1862, to Mar., 1863; in the Rappahannock Campaign (Army of the Potomac), Mar. to May, 1863, being engaged in the Battle of Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863; in the Pennsylvania Campaign (Army of the Potomac), June to July, 1863, being engaged in the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1‑3, 1863, — and Skirmish near Hagerstown, July 8, 1863; and in the Department of New Mexico, Nov., 1863, to June 27, 1865, making inspections, special investigations, explorations of country, locating military posts, scouting against Indians, etc., and was engaged in several Skirmishes. Served: in the District of New Mexico, June 27, 1865, to Aug. 31, 1867, — and at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., Sep., 1867; on leave of absence, Oct. 1, 1867, to July 29, 1868; as Inspector-General of the District of New Mexico, Oct. 19 to Nov. 28, 1868, — and of the Department of Missouri, Dec. 29, 1868, to Nov., 1872; on leave of absence, Jan. 1 to July 7, 1871; on tour of Inspection, under orders of the Secretary of War, to May 29, 1876; as Inspector-General of the Division of the Atlantic, June 9, 1876, to June 22, 1881, — and of the Division of the Missouri, o Mar. 10, 1885; and in charge of the Inspector-General's Department, to Sep. 20, 1885.

(Second Lieut., 2d Infantry, Feb. 16, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 2d Infantry, June 8, 1849) (Captain, 2d Infantry, Mar. 3, 1855)
(Colonel, 7th Massachusetts Volunteers, Sep. 4 to Nov. 12, 1861)
(Major, Staff — Asst. Inspector-General, Nov. 12, 1861)
(Bvt. Lieut.‑Col., July 3, 1863,
for Gallant and Meritorious Services at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pa.)
Colonel, Staff — Inspector-General, Mar. 23, 1864.
(Brigadier-General, Staff — Inspector-General, Mar. 11, 1885)

Retired from Active Service, Sep. 20, 1885, he being 64 Years of Age.

Died, May 15, 1890, at Governor's Island, N. Y.: Aged 69.
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132150Thomas R. McConnellGeorgiaGeorgiaNONEBvt. Second LieutenantCadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut., 3d Infantry, July 1, 1846. Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Capture of San Antonio, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848, — Ft. Gratiot, Mich., 1848‑49, — and Ft. Brady, Mich., 1849; as Adjutant, p301 4th Infantry, May 7, 1850, to May 19, 1854, — at Detroit, Mich., 1850‑51, — Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., 1851‑52, — Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1852, — Benicia, Cal., 1852, — and Ft. Vancouver, Wash., 1852‑54; and on Recruiting service, 1854‑56.

Resigned, Mar. 11, 1856.

POST Military Civil History. — Commandant of Cadets, and Professor of Engineering in the Georgia Military Institute, at Marietta, Ga., 1856‑59. Engineer of Marietta, Ga., and Ducktown Copper Mines, Ten., 1859‑61.

Died, Apr. 20, 1861, at Mobile, Ala.: Aged 36. Resigned 1856. Died Mobile, Alabama April 1861.
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132251Matthew R. StevensonNew YorkNew YorkUSACaptainCadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut., 3d Infantry, July 1, 1846. Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Capture of San Antonio, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848, — Ft. Gratiot, Mich., 1848‑49, — and Ft. Brady, Mich., 1849; as Adjutant, p301 4th Infantry, May 7, 1850, to May 19, 1854, — at Detroit, Mich., 1850‑51, — Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., 1851‑52, — Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1852, — Benicia, Cal., 1852, — and Ft. Vancouver, Wash., 1852‑54; and on Recruiting service, 1854‑56.

Resigned, Mar. 11, 1856.

POST Military Civil History. — Commandant of Cadets, and Professor of Engineering in the Georgia Military Institute, at Marietta, Ga., 1856‑59. Engineer of Marietta, Ga., and Ducktown Copper Mines, Ten., 1859‑61.

Died, Apr. 20, 1861, at Mobile, Alabamba at the age of 36 while on sick leave.
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132352George S. HumphreysConnecticutMarylandNONEBvt. Second LieutenantHumphreys was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 2d Infantry, July 1, 1846. Transferred to 2d Dragoons, Aug. 17, 1846. Served at the Cavalry School for Practice, Carlisle, Pa., 1846‑47.

Humphreys died, Nov. 9, 1847, at Carlisle Barracks, Pa.: Aged 25 while on active duty.
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132452William H. TylerVirginiaVirginiaNONEFirst LieutenantTyler was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1841, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 5th Infantry, July 1, 1846.

He served in garrison at Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1846‑47; in the War with Mexico, 1847‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — and Operations before and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; on Recruiting service, 1848; in garrison at Baton Rouge, La., 1848‑49, — and Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1849; on frontier duty at Santa Fé, N. M., 1849‑50, — and Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., 1850; and in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1850, — and Ft. Smith, Ark., 1851‑53.

(Second Lieut., 7th Infantry, Feb. 16, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 7th Infantry, Aug. 24, 1851)


He died, Oct. 24, 1853, at Woodlawn, Prince William County, Virgina at the age of 31 while on leave in in Virginia 1853.
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132554Cadmus Marcellus WilcoxNorth CarolinaTennesseeCSAMajor GeneralCadet at the Military Academy, Sep. 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Infantry, July 1, 1846. Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Skirmish of Amazoque, May 14, 1847, — as Adjutant, 7th Infantry, July 9‑14, 1847, — as Aide-de‑Camp to Major-General Quitman, July 13, 1847, to July 20, 1848, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848‑49; on Recruiting service, 1849; in Florida Hostilities against the Seminole Indians, 1849‑50; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1850, 1850‑51, — and Corpus Christi, Tex., 1851‑52; at the Military Academy, as Asst. Instructor of Infantry Tactics, Nov. 22, 1852, to Aug. 1, 1857; on leave of absence in Europe, 1857‑59; in garrison at Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1859‑60; on Recruiting service, 1860; on frontier duty at Ft. Marcy, N. M., 1860‑61, — and Ft. Fillmore, N. M., 1861; and on leave of absence, 1861.

(Second Lieut., 7th Infantry, Feb. 16, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Sep. 13, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Chapultepec, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 7th Infantry, Aug. 24, 1851)
(Captain, 7th Infantry, Dec. 20, 1860)
Resigned, June 8, 1861.
Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.​c

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.​c

POST War Civil History. — Chief of the Division of Railroads, in the General Land Office, Washington, D. C., 1888‑89.
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132655William Montgomery GardnerGeorgiaGeorgiaCSABrigadier GeneralGardner was born on June 8, 1824 at Augusta, Georgia. He was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 1st Infantry, July 1, 1846. He served in the Mexican–American War in the 2nd U.S. Infantry Regiment. He was wounded at the Battle of Churubusco, Mexico and the Battle of Contreras, Mexico. Gardner was promoted to captain on March 3, 1855. He resigned from the U.S. Army on January 19, 1861.

After his resignation from the U.S. Army, Gardner was appointed as a major of infantry in the regular army of the Confederate States on March 16, 1861.[1] He was appointed Assistant Adjutant General for the Defenses of Savannah, Georgia on May 30, 1861 but was also appointed lieutenant colonel of the 8th Georgia Infantry Regiment at the end of May 1861.[1] Acting in that assignment, Gardner was severely wounded in the leg at the Battle of First Bull Run (First Manassas), July 21, 1861.[1] Gardner was commissioned colonel on the date of the battle[3] because the colonel of the regiment, Francis S. Bartow, had been killed. Gardner's later wound also was taken to be fatal.[3] He took a year to recover and was incapacitated for further field service but he did survive.[2] While he was recovering, Gardner was appointed brigadier general, to rank from November 14, 1861.[2]

On April 1, 1862, William M. Gardner was appointed Assistant Commissary General of Subsistence for the 1st Corps of the Army of Mississippi.[1] From October 6, 1863 through February 23, 1864, he was in command of the District of Middle Florida.[1][3]

Warner states that Gardner participated in the Battle of Olustee, Florida in February 1864, although Longacre notes that Gardner's commanding officer, General P.G.T. Beauregard, did not give Gardner a field command due to his physical limitations.[4] Sifakis states there is nothing in the Official Records to indicate Gardner participated in the battle.[5] In fact, recent histories of the Civil War in Florida show that Gardner had been on sick leave in February 1864 and that Beauregard ordered Gardner to take command of the Confederate force pursuing the Union force's retreat toward Jacksonville, Florida only after the battle, when he realized Gardner had returned to duty. Gardner in fact assumed command of the force in the field soon after the battle and had his troops begin to erect fortifications outside Jacksonville until Beauregard himself arrived to take charge of the Confederate force and direct completion of the construction of defenses in March 1864.[6][7]

(Second Lieut., 7th Infantry, Feb. 16, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 2d Infantry, Oct. 16, 1849)
(Captain, 2d Infantry, Mar. 3, 1855)

Between July 26, 1864 and March 3, 1865, Gardner was chief of prisons in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida. Thereafter, he was commandant of the post at Richmond, Virginia until April 2, 1865 and briefly also Chief of the Bureau of Prisons between March 20 and March 24, 1865. No record of Gardner's parole has been found.

After the Civil War, Gardner lived for a while in Georgia[4] and then moved to Tennessee.[1] William Montgomery Gardner died June 16, 1901 at a son's home in Memphis, Tennessee.[1][2] He is buried in Elmwood Cemetery at Memphis.
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132756Edmund RusselPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaNONEFirst LieutenantRussell was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 6th Infantry, July 1, 1846.

He served on frontier duty at Ft. Smith, Ark., 1846‑47; in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, being engaged in the Capture of San Antonio, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, where he was wounded, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — and with Heavy

Battery against Chapultepec, Sep. 12‑13, 1847; in garrison at East Pascagoula, Mis., 1848, — Ft. Gratiot, Mich., 1848‑49, — Ft. Brady, Mich., 1849‑51, — Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., 1851, 1851‑52, — and Ft. Columbus,N. Y., 1852; and on frontier duty at Benicia, Cal., 1852, — Ft. Reading, Cal., 1852‑53, — and Scouting, 1853, being engaged in a Skirmish with hostile Indians near Red Bluff, California where he was Killed, Mar. 24, 1853: Aged 31.
Buried, Valley Home Cemetery, Windham, PA.

(Second Lieut., 4th Infantry, Feb. 16, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Sep. 8, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Molino del Rey, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 4th Infantry, Jan. 31, 1850)
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132857Archibald BottsVirginiaAt LargeNONEBvt. Second LieutenantBotts was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Infantry, July 1, 1846.

He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑47, on the Rio Grande Frontier.

He died Jan. 1, 1847, at Camargo, Mexico.: Aged 20.

Buried, Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, VA.​a
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132958Samuel Bell MaxeyKentuckyKentuckyCSAMajor GeneralMaxey was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 4th Infantry, July 1, 1846. He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — and Operations before and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; and in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848‑49.

Resigned, Sep. 17, 1849 and he joined in the Confederates in the Civil War from 1861‑66.​

POST War Civil History. — Counselor at Law, Clinton County, Ky., 1851‑57, — and at Paris, Tex., 1857‑61. Clerk of Circuit and County Courts, and Master in Chancery, Clinton County, Ky., 1852‑56; and District Attorney, Lamar County, Tex., 1858‑59. Counselor at Law, at Paris, Tex., since 1866. Judge of 8th District of Texas, Apr. 8, 1873: declined. Member of the United States Senate from the State of Texas, Mar. 4, 1875, to Mar. 8, 1887; and of the Board of Visitors to the U. S. Military Academy, 1877.

(Second Lieut., 8th Infantry, Feb. 23, 1847)
(Brevet First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)

He died Aug. 16, 1895, at Eureka Springs, Ark.: Aged 70.
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133059George Edward PickettVirginiaCSAMajor GeneralPickett was a Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 8th Infantry, July 1, 1846.

He served in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Capture of San Antonio, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848; on frontier duty on March through Texas to Ft. Gates, 1849‑50, 1851, — Camp Johnston, Tex., 1852, — Ft. Chadbourne, Tex., 1852‑53, — Ft. p305 Clark, Tex., 1853, — and Ft. Bliss, Tex., 1854‑55; in garrison at Ft. Monroe, Va., 1855; and on frontier duty on Expedition against hostile Indians on Puget Sound, Wash., to June, 1856, — Ft. Steilacoom, Wash., 1856,​1 — Ft. Bellingham, Wash., 1856‑58, 1859, — San Juan Island, Wash., 1859, — Ft. Bellingham, Wash., 1859‑60, — and San Juan Island, Wash., 1860‑61.

(Second Lieut., 2d Infantry, Mar. 3, 1847)
(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)
(Bvt. Capt., Sep. 13, 1847, for Gallant Conduct at Chapultepec, Mex.)
(First Lieut., 8th Infantry, June 28, 1849)
(Captain, 9th Infantry, Mar. 3, 1855)

Resigned, June 25, 1861.

Joined the Confederate in the Civil war from 1861‑66.​

POSTS War Civil History. — Merchant, Norfolk, Va., 1866‑75.

Died, July 30, 1875, at Norfolk, Va.: Aged 50.

Buried, Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, VA.
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Birkett D. FryCSABrigadier GeneralDismissed From West Point for poor grades. Fry received his education at Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, and attended the United States Military Academy, but did not graduate with the Class of 1846, having failed mathematics and been subsequently dismissed. He then returned to his native Virginia to study law. He resumed his interest in the military with the outbreak of the Mexican–American War, serving as a First Lieutenant of Voltigeurs (skirmishers).

Following the war, Fry moved to California as a "Forty-Niner." Fry practiced law in Sacramento City and was elected Justice of the Peace, Fourth Ward in 1852. In 1859 he moved to Alabama and engaged in cotton manufacturing.

With Alabama's secession from the Union, Fry enlisted in the Confederate army and was appointed Colonel of the 13th Alabama Infantry. The regiment was transported to Virginia and fought in the Peninsula Campaign. Colonel Fry was wounded in action at the Battle of Seven Pines. He recovered in time to command his regiment in the savage fighting at Antietam, where he was again wounded, suffering a shattered arm.

Fry rejoined his regiment and led it during the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville, where he suffered a third wound.[1] During the subsequent Gettysburg Campaign, Fry's regiment was among the first Confederate units to deploy into battle line and engage the Union cavalry of John Buford at the opening of the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. His men suffered considerable casualties as the day progressed after being driven off McPherson's Ridge by the arrival of the Federal Iron Brigade. With the capture of Brig. Gen. James J. Archer, Fry assumed command of Archer's Brigade of Tennesseans and Alabamians.[1] Held in reserve on July 2, Fry's brigade was a key part of the July 3 attack that became famous as Pickett's Charge.[1] He suffered yet another wound, and fell near the Union lines. Fry was treated in a local field hospital then held as a prisoner of war at Fort McHenry in Baltimore,

There, rumors circulated that Fry had been involved in the August 1862 murder of Union general Robert L. McCook in Alabama. Fry's West Point classmate, John Gibbon, who ironically commanded the troops that had shot Fry at Gettysburg, vouched for his character and the matter was forgotten.

Exchanged in 1864, Fry rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia in time for the beginning of the Siege of Petersburg. During Philip H. Sheridan's raid on Richmond in early May, Fry was assigned command of Seth Barton's Virginia brigade, leading it during the Battle of Meadow Bridge. He was promoted to brigadier general on May 24, 1864.

During the final months of the war, Fry was placed in command of a military district in South Carolina and Georgia.

After surrendering in Augusta, Fry emigrated to Cuba at the close of hostilities, lodging in Havana hotels with several other former prominent Confederates, including Jubal A. Early, John C. Breckinridge, Robert A. Toombs, and John B. Magruder, among others. He did not return to the United States until 1868, when he returned to Tallassee, Alabama as a businessman. Fry later expanded his business career in Florida, and, in 1881, moved to Richmond, Virginia, where he was president of a cotton mill for a decade.[4]

Fry died in Richmond on January 21, 1891 and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Montgomery, Alabama.
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Thomas J. LoweNONEDismissed for irrepressibly questionable conduct.NO DATA
Samuel H. RaymondNONEDied at West Point 1845NO DATA